Galerie Nagel Draxler

Pedro Wirz "Verwachsen"

Eröffnung: Freitag, 13. September 2019, 18-21 Uhr
Opening: Friday, 13 September 2019, 6-9 pm

Galerie Nagel Draxler
Weydingerstr. 2/4
10178 Berlin

Öffnungszeiten / Hours:
Dienstag – Samstag: 11 – 18 Uhr / Tuesday – Saturday: 11 am – 6 pm

Öffnungszeiten während Berlin Art Week / Hours during Berlin Art Week:
Samstag, 14. Sept.: 11 – 18 Uhr & Sonntag, 15. Sept.: 11 – 16 Uhr
Saturday, 15th Sept.: 11 am – 6 pm & Sunday, 15th Sept.: 11 am – 4 pm

19-Pedro Wirz_DXH5471
Pedro Wirz
"Verwachsen"
Installation view, 2019

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Verwachsen"
Installation view, 2019

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Verwachsen"
Installation view, 2019

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Verwachsen"
Installation view, 2019

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Verwachsen"
Installation view, 2019

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Verwachsen"
Installation view, 2019

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Entsprechung III", 2019
Soil, beeswax, papier-mâché, textile debris, and acrylic paint on wood construction
100 x 50 x 25 cm

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Entsprechung V", 2019
Bleached beeswax, soil, styrofoam, old clothing, and synthetic wool on wood construction
198 x 100 x 40 cm

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Entsprechung IV", 2019
Beeswax, electronic junk, animal fur, textile debris, and plastic pipes on wood construction
100 x 50 x 25 cm

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Entsprechung II", 2019
Soil, beeswax, and textile debris on wood construction
80 x 60 x 20 cm

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Entsprechung I", 2019
Soil, beeswax, metallic poles, animal fur, textile debris, and acrylic paint on wood construction
198 x 100 x 30 cm

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Stau", 2019
Wood, beeswax, fabric, and toys
35 x 25 x 5 cm

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Wet Transistor (2)", 2019
Blown glass, cast bronze, textile debris, beeswax, wire, and soil on iron support
170 x 80 x 80 cm

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Wet Transistor (1)", 2019
Blown glass, cast bronze, textile debris, beeswax, wire, and soil on iron support
170 x 80 x 80 cm

Photo:Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Wet Transistor (4)", 2019
Blown glass, cast bronze, textile debris, beeswax, wire, and soil on iron support
170 x 80 x 80 cm

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Wet Transistor (3)", 2019
Blown glass, cast bronze, textile debris, beeswax, wire, and soil on iron support
170 x 80 x 80 cm

Photo: Simon VogelPedro Wirz
"Heaters", 2019
Soil, styrofoam, wood glue, power cable
25 x 25 x 25 cm

Photo: Simon Vogel

Pressetext

“Verwachsen” is Brazilian Swiss artist Pedro Wirz’s first solo exhibition at Galerie Nagel Draxler. The title could be translated as “Grow into One Another,” and it indicates Wirz’s interest in ecology. The entwining it describes accounts for both human and non-human agents, while also thinking in terms of milieu. Wirz’s primarily sculptural practice is based on associations with forms and materials. He creates eggs and coils and bulbous protrusions with holes in them or mounds and towers and sinuous branches. Writers have commented that the work calls forth a sense of primordial or mystical origins. The artist has responded by offering his biography as a frame of reference, a kind of personal mythology––his upbringing in rural Brazil, the child of a biologist and an agronomist. But Wirz’s vocabulary draws equally from organic matter, consumer culture, contemporary artistic conventions, and experimentation with material. “Verwachsen” features three bodies of work: “Entsprechung IV” (Correspondence I–V), the wall-mounted assemblages in round-edged, wooden frames, which continue a series begun by the artist earlier this year. The new, standing, glass-steel-and-textile sculptures that Wirz refers to as “Wet Transistors.” And the “Heaters,” or spheres of Styrofoam and soil, each with an electrical cord that plugs into the wall.

From early on in his artistic work, Wirz’s thinking has been relational. Several years ago, I suggested that “Wirz’s work toys with the principles of social interaction.” By ‘social,’ I meant interpersonal, but I was also alluding to the fact that the artist’s work was specifically relation building. He used his practice as a means to connect and to maintain connections that were to an extent professional. His focus wasn’t yet the materials that serve as a mediating, perhaps determining, factor in humans’ experience of our environment; the materials that form the medium for our interactions as well as for the impact we have in the world.

The work Wirz has been making recently focuses on relations by way of materials. It deals with processing and its means, processing and its products, processing and waste. So alongside materials that are raw and others that were processed, just not by human hands, we find steel, glass, and mass-produced garments. We see beeswax that was bleached artificially and text and image fragments from newspapers repurposed via papier mâché. These materials have history, but it’s abstract. We don’t see industry represented or critiqued; we see the results of its infrastructure set within a broader context. The work consistently frames contemporary culture in terms of environment and nature in terms of a shifting timeline. Wirz’s work is research-driven, but in a general way––into naturally occurring and widely distributed forms that might thus seem originary or universal. Of course, this raises questions about that nature, those origins, that universalism. If these sound like familiar questions, it could nevertheless be argued that, lately, ‘nature’ has been pressing on or prompting a shift in our understanding of ‘culture,’ once again highlighting how unreliable that distinction is.

The relations-forward discourse on materials from recent years seems to represent a logical context for Wirz’s practice. That discourse would also seem to offer a welcome contrast to technophilic narratives of pure information, pure materials, and frictionless circulation. When I looked into Bruno Latour’s already 15-year-old introduction to actor-network theory, I was struck by the indirect aspect of it, in that it’s actually about materials such as speed bumps and how they can determine human behavior. Since seemingly incidental objects or structures can have a leveling effect on subject responses, for example leading all drivers to slow down, we should perhaps understand the role they play as active or at least substantial. Wirz has an ongoing interest in framing devices. Already as a student, he was making work dealing with pedestals. Now those white, soberly rectilinear, standard versions are packed with a layer of humus or have swollen in places with a kind of body. All the works in this show have frames, too. The pieces on the wall have their wooden edges with rounded corners inherited by way of contemporary tech. The leg-like cilia of the standing sculptures are themselves frames. By plugging the Styrofoam-and-soil “Heaters” into the wall, Wirz implicates the gallery architecture as a container, thus emphasizing context and connectivity. He has elsewhere created his own environments by laying carpet, clothes, or soil from wall to wall or formed backdrops by draping a given wall with fabric.

The heart of this work is almost certainly what happens to the means themselves, what binds them together, and––in a kind of parallel movement––what associations viewers then draw from them. The title “Verwachsen” could describe that connective force. Wirz would probably also talk about it in terms of energy or magic, whereas I would tend to think in terms of a sociocultural frame of reference or in terms of infrastructure, like clothing manufacturing. I have questions about creating myths for the contemporary everyday. Are narratives of transformation and extension not just euphemisms for optimization and economic growth? Does the emphasis on non-human agency and intelligence not deflect from urgent questions about how human agency is currently being both exercised as well as restricted? Do materials allow us to speak in terms of structure? Does adaptation promise too rosy a future? This said, an insistently cultural frame might occlude thinking about the non-human or prohibit alternative ways of thinking and forms of life. Wirz’s material language invites this kind of speculation.

– John Beeson

_____________________

„Verwachsen“ ist die erste Einzelausstellung des brasilianisch-schweizerischen Künstlers Pedro Wirz in der Galerie Nagel Draxler. Der Titel lässt Wirz’ Interesse an der Ökologie anklingen. Die Verwobenheit, die er beschreibt, bezieht sich auf beides, auf das menschliche und nicht-menschliche Subjekt, gleichzeitig reflektiert er die Fragen des Milieus.
Wirz’ in erster Linie skulpturale Praxis basiert auf einer Auseinandersetzung mit Form und Material. Er kreiert Eier und Schlangen, bauchige Auswüchse mit Löchern oder Hügel und Türme und gewundene Äste. Oft wird angemerkt, dass seinen Arbeiten vormoderne oder mystische Ursprünge anhaften, die Herkunft solcher Referenzen sieht der Künstler in seiner Biografie, eine Art persönlicher Mythos – sein Aufgewachsensein im ländlichen Teil Brasiliens als Sohn einer Biologin und eines Agrarwissenschaftlers. Darüber hinaus speist sich Wirz’ Vokabular gleichermaßen aus organischer Materie, aus Elementen der Konsumkultur, aus Konventionen der zeitgenössischen Kunst und aus Materialexperimenten.

In ‚Verwachsen‘ erscheinen drei Werkgruppen vereint: Bei „Entsprechung I-V“ handelt es sich um Wandassemblagen mit abgerundeten Holzrahmen, die eine Serie aus seiner diesjährigen Ausstellung im Kunsthaus Langenthal fortsetzen. Daneben gibt es die neuen, freistehenden Glas-Stahl-Textil-Skulpturen, die den Titel „Wet-Transitors“ tragen und schließlich die „Heaters“, Kugeln aus Styropor und Erde, aus denen Elektrokabel wachsen, die in den Bodensteckdosen des Ausstellungsraumes enden.

Wirz’ Denken in Bezug auf seine künstlerische Praxis war und ist stets relational. Vor ein paar Jahren habe ich selbst diesbezüglich geschrieben, dass er mit den Prinzipien der sozialen Interaktion spiele. Mit sozial meinte ich zwischenmenschlich, jedoch ging es mir vielmehr darum, zu zeigen, dass seine Arbeit speziell auf das Herstellen von Beziehungen abzielte. Er nutzte den Schaffungsprozess, um bis zu einem gewissen Grade professionelle Beziehungen zu bilden und zu pflegen. Es ging dabei noch nicht um die Materialien und Faktoren, die die menschlichen Beziehungen zur Umwelt bestimmen; Materialien, die die Medien unserer Interaktion mit der Welt und unseren Einfluss auf sie formen.

Wirz’ jüngste Arbeiten rücken Materialbeziehungen in den Fokus. Sie beschäftigen sich mit der Bedeutung von Produktionsprozessen und -mitteln sowie mit dem Abfall dieser. Neben Materialien, die ‚roh‘ und solchen, die (nicht zwangsläufig durch menschliches Zutun) weiterverarbeitet sind, sehen wir Stahl, Glas und Kleidung aus der Massenproduktion, künstlich gebleichtes Bienenwachs sowie Text und Bildfragmente, die zu Pappmaché verarbeitet wurden. Es sind Materialien mit Geschichte, jedoch von abstrakter Art. Wir sehen hier keine Repräsentation oder Kritik des Industriellen, vielmehr sehen wir das Resultat einer industriellen Infrastruktur. Die Arbeiten setzen die zeitgenössische Kultur beharrlich den Komponenten von Umwelt und Natur im Sinne einer sich verschiebenden Zeitlichkeit aus. Seine Werke sind Recherchen basiert, aber auf eine allgemeine Weise, bezogen auf natürlich anmutende und weitverbreitete Formen, die so als ursprünglich oder universell erscheinen. Natürlich wirft das Fragen nach „dieser“ Natur, „diesen“ Ursprüngen und „diesem“ Universalismus auf. Auch wenn diese Fragen vertraut klingen, so könnte man doch argumentieren, dass seit geraumer Zeit die „Natur“ eine Verschiebung der Wahrnehmung in unserem Verständnis von „Kultur“ auslöst, was wieder einmal belegt, wie schwammig die Unterscheidung zwischen beiden ist.

Der bezugsorientierte Materialdiskurs der letzten Jahre scheint der logische Kontext für Wirz’ Praxis zu sein. Dieser Diskurs scheint auch den nötigen Kontrast zum technikbegeisterten Narrativ reiner Information, purer Materialien und steriler Zirkulation zu bieten. Bei der Lektüre der mittlerweile 15 Jahre alten Einführung Bruno Latours zur Akteur-Netzwerk-Theorie, beeindruckte mich vor allem der Aspekt der „Indirektheit“, insofern dass er über konkrete Materialien, beispielsweise Temposchwellen, definiert, wie diese das menschliche Verhalten vorherbestimmen. Es zeigt sich, wie scheinbar beiläufige Objekte oder Strukturen entscheidende Auswirkungen auf Reaktionen des Subjekts haben, wie in diesem Falle das Abbremsen aller Autofahrer. Hier zeigt sich letztlich die aktive, wenn nicht sogar substantielle Rolle des Objektes.

Wirz interessiert sich stets für derartige Rahmenbedingungen. Bereits als Student beschäftige er sich in seinen Arbeiten mit Sockeln. Nun sind diese weißen, absolut geradlinigen Standardprodukte mit Schichten von Erde überzogen oder schwellen zu einer Körperlichkeit an. Auch haben all seine Arbeiten einen Rahmen. Nach dem Vorbild des modernen Designs technischer Geräte (IPhone) haben die Holzrahmen der Wandarbeiten abgerundete Ecken. Die spinnenartigen Ständer der Skulpturen sind selbst Rahmen. Durch das Einstecken der Styropor-Erde-Heaters im Boden transformiert er die Galeriearchitektur zum Energiecontainer, Kontext und Verbundenheit betonend. Auch in anderen Ausstellungen hat der Künstler seine eigene Umgebung geschaffen, indem er zum Beispiel einen Teppich verlegt, Kleidung verteilt, Erde verstreut oder Wände mit Vorhangstoff überzogen hat.

Was mit den Materialien selbst passiert, was sie zu zusammenfügt und was der Betrachter sozusagen parallel damit assoziiert, bildet den Kern seines Schaffens. Der Titel „Verwachsen“ kann diese verbindende Kraft beschreiben. Wirz würde vielleicht auch von Energie oder Magie sprechen, wohingegen ich eher sozialkulturelle oder infrastrukturelle Referenzen, wie zum Beispiel die Bekleidungsherstellung, sehe. Es stellt sich mir die Frage, wie Alltagsmythen entstehen. Sind Begriffe wie Verwandlung und Erweiterung nicht nur Euphemismen für Optimierung und Wirtschaftswachstum? Lenkt das Betonen der Vorteile maschinengesteuerter Arbeit und künstlicher Intelligenz von dringenden Fragen, wie zum Beispiel zu den menschlichen Arbeitsbedingungen ab? Erlauben uns Materialien von Struktur zu sprechen? Verspricht Anpassung eine zu rosige Zukunft? Es wird deutlich, dass eine konstante Hinterfragung kultureller Werte ein Nachdenken über das Nicht-Menschliche einschließen oder alternative Denk- und Lebensweisen ausschließen kann. Wirz’ Materialsprache lädt zu einer Spekulation ein.

– John Beeson / übersetzt